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International Journal of Aerospace Engineering
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6143727, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6143727
Research Article

Architecture Level Safety Analyses for Safety-Critical Systems

Aerospace Electronics & Systems Division, CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence should be addressed to K. S. Kushal; moc.liamg@881162ksk

Received 24 August 2016; Revised 23 November 2016; Accepted 15 December 2016; Published 15 January 2017

Academic Editor: Paul Williams

Copyright © 2017 K. S. Kushal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The dependency of complex embedded Safety-Critical Systems across Avionics and Aerospace domains on their underlying software and hardware components has gradually increased with progression in time. Such application domain systems are developed based on a complex integrated architecture, which is modular in nature. Engineering practices assured with system safety standards to manage the failure, faulty, and unsafe operational conditions are very much necessary. System safety analyses involve the analysis of complex software architecture of the system, a major aspect in leading to fatal consequences in the behaviour of Safety-Critical Systems, and provide high reliability and dependability factors during their development. In this paper, we propose an architecture fault modeling and the safety analyses approach that will aid in identifying and eliminating the design flaws. The formal foundations of SAE Architecture Analysis & Design Language (AADL) augmented with the Error Model Annex (EMV) are discussed. The fault propagation, failure behaviour, and the composite behaviour of the design flaws/failures are considered for architecture safety analysis. The illustration of the proposed approach is validated by implementing the Speed Control Unit of Power-Boat Autopilot (PBA) system. The Error Model Annex (EMV) is guided with the pattern of consideration and inclusion of probable failure scenarios and propagation of fault conditions in the Speed Control Unit of Power-Boat Autopilot (PBA). This helps in validating the system architecture with the detection of the error event in the model and its impact in the operational environment. This also provides an insight of the certification impact that these exceptional conditions pose at various criticality levels and design assurance levels and its implications in verifying and validating the designs.