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International Journal of Breast Cancer
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 923250, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/923250
Review Article

The Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Crosstalk with Estrogen Receptor in Response of Breast Cancer Cells to the Novel Antitumor Agents Benzothiazoles and Aminoflavone

Research Area, Institute of Oncology “Ángel H. Roffo”, University of Buenos Aires, Avenue San Martín 5481, C1417DTB Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 30 April 2011; Accepted 14 June 2011

Academic Editor: Alejandro J. Urtreger

Copyright © 2011 Mariana A. Callero and Andrea I. Loaiza-Pérez. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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