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International Journal of Breast Cancer
Volume 2013, Article ID 872743, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/872743
Review Article

Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of MCF10DCIS and SUM Breast Cancer Cell Lines

1Asterand US, 440 Burroughs, Tech One Building, Suite 501, Detroit, MI 48202-3420, USA
2ALN Associates, 170 Mount Vernon Street, Winchester, MA 01890, USA

Received 31 August 2012; Revised 31 October 2012; Accepted 8 November 2012

Academic Editor: Debra A. Tonetti

Copyright © 2013 Nandita Barnabas and Dalia Cohen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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