International Journal of Biomedical Imaging

International Journal of Biomedical Imaging / 2007 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 024826 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/24826

Qing He, Ye Duan, Judith Miles, Nicole Takahashi, "A Context-Sensitive Active Contour for 2D Corpus Callosum Segmentation", International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, vol. 2007, Article ID 024826, 8 pages, 2007. https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/24826

A Context-Sensitive Active Contour for 2D Corpus Callosum Segmentation

Academic Editor: Guowei Wei
Received15 Jun 2007
Revised09 Sep 2007
Accepted21 Oct 2007
Published31 Dec 2007

Abstract

We propose a new context-sensitive active contour for 2D corpus callosum segmentation. After a seed contour consisting of interconnected parts is being initialized by the user, each part will start to deform according to its own motion law derived from high-level prior knowledge, and is constantly aware of its own orientation and destination during the deformation process. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of our algorithm.

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Copyright © 2007 Qing He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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