Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume 2008, Article ID 143238, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/143238
Research Article

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Affects Performance of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task during Provision of Feedback

1Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montréal, PQ, Canada H3A 2B4
2PET Imaging Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1R8
3Functional Neuroimaging Unit, Geriatric’s Institute, University of Montréal, Montréal, PQ, Canada H3W 1W5
4Toronto Western Research Institute and Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 2S8

Received 20 October 2007; Accepted 22 December 2007

Academic Editor: Julien Doyon

Copyright © 2008 Ji Hyun Ko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. B. Milner, “Effects of brain lesions on card sorting,” Archives of Neurology, vol. 9, pp. 90–100, 1963. View at Google Scholar
  2. H. E. Nelson, “A modified card sorting test sensitive to frontal lobe defects,” Cortex, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 313–324, 1976. View at Google Scholar
  3. D. T. Stuss, B. Levine, M. P. Alexander et al., “Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in patients with focal frontal and posterior brain damage: effects of lesion location and test structure on separable cognitive processes,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 388–402, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. O. Monchi, M. Petrides, V. Petre, K. Worsley, and A. Dagher, “Wisconsin Card Sorting revisited: distinct neural circuits participating in different stages of the task identified by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 19, pp. 7733–7741, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  5. O. Monchi, M. Petrides, A. P. Strafella, K. J. Worsley, and J. Doyon, “Functional role of the basal ganglia in the planning and execution of actions,” Annals of Neurology, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 257–264, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. A. M. Owen, “Cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease: the role of frontostriatal circuitry,” The Neuroscientist, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 525–537, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. M. Petrides, “Functional specialization within the dorsolateral frontal cortex for serial order memory,” Proceedings of the Royal Society. Series B, vol. 246, no. 1317, pp. 299–306, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. M. Petrides, “Frontal lobes and behaviour,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 207–211, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. M. Petrides, “The role of the mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in working memory,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 133, no. 1, pp. 44–54, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. M. F. Rushworth, K. A. Hadland, T. Paus, and P. K. Sipila, “Role of the human medial frontal cortex in task switching: a combined fMRI and TMS study,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 2577–2592, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  11. J. A. Johnson, A. P. Strafella, and R. J. Zatorre, “The role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in bimodal divided attention: two transcranial magnetic stimulation studies,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 907–920, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. A. Pascual-Leone, J. Valls-Solé, E. M. Wassermann, and M. Hallett, “Responses to rapid-rate transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex,” Brain, vol. 117, no. 4, pp. 847–858, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. H. Enomoto, Y. Ugawa, R. Hanajima et al., “Decreased sensory cortical excitability after 1 Hz rTMS over the ipsilateral primary motor cortex,” Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 112, no. 11, pp. 2154–2158, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. Y. Z. Huang, M. J. Edwards, E. Rounis, K. P. Bhatia, and J. C. Rothwell, “Theta burst stimulation of the human motor cortex,” Neuron, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 201–206, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. V. Walsh and A. Cowey, “Transcranial magnetic stimulation and cognitive neuroscience,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 73–79, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. R. C. Oldfield, “The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh inventory,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 97–113, 1971. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. J. Talairach and P. Tournoux, Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain: 3-Dimensional Proportional System: An Approach to Cerebral Imaging, Thieme Medical Publishers, New York, NY, USA, 1988.
  18. T. Paus, “Imaging the brain before, during, and after transcranial magnetic stimulation,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 219–224, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. A. P. Strafella, T. Paus, J. Barrett, and A. Dagher, “Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human prefrontal cortex induces dopamine release in the caudate nucleus,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 15, pp. RC1571–RC1574, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  20. D. L. Collins, P. Neelin, T. M. Peters, and A. C. Evans, “Automatic 3D intersubject registration of MR volumetric data in standardized Talairach space,” Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 192–205, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  21. E. M. Wassermann, “Risk and safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: report and suggested guidelines from the International Workshop on the Safety of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, June 5–7, 1996,” Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 108, no. 1, pp. 1–16, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  22. S. W. Kennerley, K. Sakai, and M. F. Rushworth, “Organization of action sequences and the role of the pre-SMA,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 978–993, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. K. A. Hadland, M. F. Rushworth, R. E. Passingham, M. Jahanshahi, and J. C. Rothwell, “Interference with performance of a response selection task that has no working memory component: an rTMS comparison of the dorsolateral prefrontal and medial frontal cortex,” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 13, no. 8, pp. 1097–1108, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. M. Petrides, “Lateral prefrontal cortex: architectonic and functional organization,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, vol. 360, no. 1456, pp. 781–795, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. F. A. Mansouri, K. Matsumoto, and K. Tanaka, “Prefrontal cell activities related to monkeys' success and failure in adapting to rule changes in a Wisconsin Card Sorting Test analog,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 2745–2756, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. M. Wagner, T. A. Rihs, U. P. Mosimann, H. U. Fisch, and T. E. Schlaepfer, “Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex affects divided attention immediately after cessation of stimulation,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 315–321, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. S. D. Iversen and M. Mishkin, “Perseverative interference in monkeys following selective lesions of the inferior prefrontal convexity,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 376–386, 1970. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  28. V. Walsh and A. Pascual-Leone, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Neurochronometrics of Mind, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 2003.
  29. A. Pascual-Leone, V. Walsh, and J. Rothwell, “Transcranial magnetic stimulation in cognitive neuroscience—virtual lesion, chronometry, and functional connectivity,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 232–237, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. N. Modugno, Y. Nakamura, C. D. MacKinnon et al., “Motor cortex excitability following short trains of repetitive magnetic stimuli,” Experimental Brain Research, vol. 140, no. 4, pp. 453–459, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. A. C. Roberts, M. A. De Salvia, L. S. Wilkinson et al., “6-Hydroxydopamine lesions of the prefrontal cortex in monkeys enhance performance on an analog of the Wisconsin Card Sort Test: possible interactions with subcortical dopamine,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 2531–2544, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  32. P. Collins, L. S. Wilkinson, B. J. Everitt, T. W. Robbins, and A. C. Roberts, “The effect of dopamine depletion from the caudate nucleus of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) on tests of prefrontal cognitive function,” Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 114, no. 1, pp. 3–17, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. O. Monchi, J. H. Ko, and A. P. Strafella, “Striatal dopamine release during performance of executive functions: a [C11] raclopride PET study,” NeuroImage, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 907–912, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. V. L. Cropley, M. Fujita, R. B. Innis, and P. J. Nathan, “Molecular imaging of the dopaminergic system and its association with human cognitive function,” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 59, no. 10, pp. 898–907, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar