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International Journal of Biomedical Imaging
Volume 2008, Article ID 672582, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/672582
Review Article

The Role of Noninvasive Techniques in Stroke Therapy

1Institute of Biotechnology University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 3HU, UK
2Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5
3Functional Neuroimaging Unit, University of Montreal Geriatric Institute, 4565, Queen-Mary Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3W 1W5

Received 3 May 2007; Accepted 25 September 2007

Academic Editor: Oury Monchi

Copyright © 2008 Daniel Maxwell Bernad and Julien Doyon. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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