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International Journal of Biomaterials
Volume 2010, Article ID 947232, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/947232
Research Article

Elastic Membrane That Undergoes Mechanical Deformation Enhances Osteoblast Cellular Attachment and Proliferation

1Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, SEAS, University of Pennsylvania, 210S 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SEAS, University of Pennsylvania, 321 LRSM, Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3Department of Bioengineering, SEAS, University of Pennsylvania, 115 Hayden Hall, 210S 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Received 30 October 2009; Revised 23 February 2010; Accepted 16 April 2010

Academic Editor: Mohamed Rahaman

Copyright © 2010 G. K. Toworfe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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