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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 136802, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/136802
Review Article

Band 3 Missense Mutations and Stomatocytosis: Insight into the Molecular Mechanism Responsible for Monovalent Cation Leak

1Institut de Biologie du Développement et Cancer, UMR6543, CNRS, 28 Avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France
2Institut de Biologie du Développement et Cancer, Université de Nice, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France

Received 6 April 2011; Revised 27 May 2011; Accepted 29 May 2011

Academic Editor: Lars Kaestner

Copyright © 2011 Damien Barneaud-Rocca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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