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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 451676, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/451676
Review Article

The Mammary Gland Microenvironment Directs Progenitor Cell Fate In Vivo

Mammary Biology and Tumorigenesis Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 14 January 2011; Accepted 11 March 2011

Academic Editor: Michael Hortsch

Copyright © 2011 Karen M. Bussard and Gilbert H. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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