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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2011, Article ID 529851, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/529851
Research Article

Acute Immobilization Stress Modulate GABA Release from Rat Olfactory Bulb: Involvement of Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids and Acute Stress Modulate GABA Release

Laboratorio Neuroquimica, Apartado 20632, CBB, IVIC, Caracas 1020 A, Venezuela

Received 4 February 2011; Revised 8 April 2011; Accepted 17 May 2011

Academic Editor: Govindan Dayanithi

Copyright © 2011 Alejandra Delgado and Erica H. Jaffé. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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