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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 176287, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/176287
Review Article

Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes: A Concerto en Duo in Ischemic Pathophysiology

1Université Lille Nord de France, 59000 Lille, France
2UArtois, LBHE, EA 2465, 62300 Lens, France
3IMPRT-IFR114, 59000 Lille, France
4Departments of Physiology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
5Departments of Pediatrics, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA

Received 2 March 2012; Accepted 30 April 2012

Academic Editor: Carola Förster

Copyright © 2012 Vincent Berezowski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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