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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 320531, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/320531
Review Article

The ADF/Cofilin-Pathway and Actin Dynamics in Podocyte Injury

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Medical School Hannover, 30625 Hannover, Germany

Received 2 August 2011; Revised 22 September 2011; Accepted 12 October 2011

Academic Editor: Richard Gomer

Copyright © 2012 Beina Teng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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