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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 391914, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/391914
Review Article

Nitric Oxide Inactivation Mechanisms in the Brain: Role in Bioenergetics and Neurodegeneration

Faculty of Pharmacy and Center for Neurosciences and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Health Sciences Campus, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal

Received 27 March 2012; Accepted 18 April 2012

Academic Editor: Juan P. Bolaños

Copyright © 2012 Ricardo M. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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