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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 735206, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/735206
Review Article

Mitochondrial- and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Biomarkers

1Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC), University of Coimbra, Largo Marquês de Pombal 3004-517, Coimbra, Portugal
2Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga 3004-504, Coimbra, Portugal
3University Coimbra Hospital, 3000-075, Coimbra, Portugal

Received 20 February 2012; Accepted 6 April 2012

Academic Editor: Juan P. Bola_os

Copyright © 2012 E. Ferreiro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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