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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2012, Article ID 762825, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/762825
Review Article

Oxidative Stress, Tumor Microenvironment, and Metabolic Reprogramming: A Diabolic Liaison

Department of Biochemical Sciences, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy

Received 2 February 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Filomeni

Copyright © 2012 Tania Fiaschi and Paola Chiarugi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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