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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 242513, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/242513
Review Article

PKM2, a Central Point of Regulation in Cancer Metabolism

Nicholas Wong,1,2,3,4 Jason De Melo,1,2,3,4 and Damu Tang1,2,3,4

1Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada
2Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4L8, Canada
3Father Sean O'Sullivan Research Centre, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 4A6
4The Hamilton Center for Kidney Research, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 4A6

Received 2 December 2012; Revised 11 January 2013; Accepted 13 January 2013

Academic Editor: Claudia Cerella

Copyright © 2013 Nicholas Wong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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