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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013, Article ID 636050, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/636050
Review Article

Alternative Splicing Regulation of Cancer-Related Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: An In Vivo Model System with a Powerful Reverse Genetics Toolbox

1SomaGenics, Inc., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
2Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, The Center for Molecular Biology of RNA, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA

Received 17 June 2013; Accepted 29 July 2013

Academic Editor: Claudio Sette

Copyright © 2013 Sergio Barberán-Soler and James Matthew Ragle. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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