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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 705027, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/705027
Review Article

Endocan in Cancers: A Lesson from a Circulating Dermatan Sulfate Proteoglycan

1Lunginnov, Campus de l'Institut Pasteur de Lille, 59000 Lille, France
2Centre de Biologie-Pathologie-Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille Cedex, France
3Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel, Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 5075, CNRS-CEA-Université Joseph Fourier, 38027 Grenoble, France

Received 12 November 2012; Accepted 27 February 2013

Academic Editor: Afshin Samali

Copyright © 2013 Maryse Delehedde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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