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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2014, Article ID 152645, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/152645
Research Article

Changes in the Distribution of the α3 Na+/K+ ATPase Subunit in Heterozygous Lurcher Purkinje Cells as a Genetic Model of Chronic Depolarization during Development

1Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, P.O. Box 21247, Baltimore, MD 21228, USA
2Department of Biology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
3Université Pierre et Marie Curie-P6, UMR7102, 75005 Paris, France
4Institut de la Longévité, Hôpital Charles Foix, 94205 Ivry-Sur-Seine, France

Received 9 October 2013; Revised 28 December 2013; Accepted 13 January 2014; Published 27 February 2014

Academic Editor: Alessio D’Alessio

Copyright © 2014 Rebecca McFarland et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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