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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9025905, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9025905
Review Article

Connexin’s Connection in Breast Cancer Growth and Progression

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, Columbia University, 1130 St Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 31 March 2016; Accepted 18 July 2016

Academic Editor: Rony Seger

Copyright © 2016 Debarshi Banerjee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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