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International Journal of Cell Biology
Volume 2016, Article ID 9259646, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9259646
Review Article

Biologics for Targeting Inflammatory Cytokines, Clinical Uses, and Limitations

1The Department of Pathology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 6997801 Tel-Aviv, Israel
2Galilee Medical Center, 22100 Nahariya, Israel

Received 9 August 2016; Revised 3 October 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016

Academic Editor: Paul J. Higgins

Copyright © 2016 Peleg Rider et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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