Table 1: Meta-analyses on the relationship between human adv-36 infection and obesity development in humans.

StudyNumber of casesPopulation sizeStudy end pointsMajor findings

Xu et al. [17](i) 9 cross-sectional studies, 9 case-control studies, and 6 cohort studies(i) 10191 study subjects including adults and children(i) HAdV-36 infection rate in obese and lean groups
(ii) BMI level and BMI z-score in HAdV-36 positive and negative groups
(i) HAdV-36 infection increased the risk of obesity
(ii) HAdV-36
also increased the risk of weight gain in adults, which was not observed in
children

Shang et al. [18](i) 11 case control studies(i) 5739 study subjects including adults and children(i) HAdV-36 infection and obesity risk(i) HAdV-36 infection is associated with an increased risk of obesity development
(ii) Risk is increased in children and those with a BMI of ≥30 kg/cm2

Yamada et al. [19](i) 10 cross-sectional studies(i) 2870 study subjects including adults and children(i) Evaluating the association between HAdV-36 infection and obesity/metabolic markers(i) HAdV-36 infection is associated with the risk of obesity and weight gain, but not with abnormal metabolic markers including waist circumference