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International Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 939161, 31 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/939161
Review Article

A Review on Heavy Metals (As, Pb, and Hg) Uptake by Plants through Phytoremediation

1Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangin, Malaysia
2Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangin, Malaysia
3Tasik Chini Reasearch Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangin, Malaysia

Received 17 March 2011; Accepted 3 June 2011

Academic Editor: Hans-Jörg Bart

Copyright © 2011 Bieby Voijant Tangahu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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