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International Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 2016, Article ID 4803254, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4803254
Research Article

Influence of Sodium Bisulfite and Lithium Bromide Solutions on the Shape Fixation of Camel Guard Hairs in Slenderization Process

1School of Textiles and Clothing, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
2Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong

Received 5 December 2015; Accepted 7 February 2016

Academic Editor: Sébastien Déon

Copyright © 2016 Xueliang Xiao and Jinlian Hu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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