International Journal of Computer Games Technology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision54 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore2.600
Impact Factor-

Visualization of Coalescence of Multiple Small Bubbles with Closed B-Spline Curve

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Computer Games Technology publishes original research and review articles on both the research and development aspects of games technology covering the whole range of entertainment computing and interactive digital media.

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International Journal of Computer Games Technology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Method for Selecting an Engagement Index for a Specific Type of Game Using Cognitive Neuroscience

The popularity of video games means that methods are needed to assess their content in terms of player satisfaction right from the production stage. For this purpose, the indicators used in EEG studies can be used. This publication presents a method that has been developed to determine whether a person likes an arcade game. To this end, six different indicators to measure consumer involvement in a video game using the EEG were compared, among others. The study was conducted using several different games created in Unity based on the observation () of the respondents. EEG has been used to select the most suitable indices studied.

Research Article

Business Intelligence Challenges for Independent Game Publishing

With the continuous development of the game industry, research in the game field is also deepening. Many interdisciplinary areas of knowledge and theory have been used to promote the development of the game industry. Business intelligence technologies have been applied to game development for game design and game optimization. However, few systematic research efforts have focused on the field of game publishing, particularly with regard to independent (indie) game publishing. In this paper, we analyse data collected from a set of interviews with small indie game developers. The results indicate that most of the indie game developers have already used business intelligence for game self-publishing, although three main challenges have been identified: first, how to conduct marketing promotion and improve the return on investment (ROI); second, how to collect game publishing data; and third, how to analyse the data in order to guide game self-publishing. Our interviews also reveal that the business model applied to a game significantly impacts the role of game analytics. The study expands and advances the research on how game analytics can be used for game publishing, particularly for indie game self-publishing.

Research Article

ALTRIRAS: A Computer Game for Training Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Recognition of Basic Emotions

This paper presents a computer game developed to assist children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to recognize facial expressions associated with the four basic emotions: joy, sadness, anger, and surprise. This game named ALTRIRAS is a role-playing game (RPG), a kind of game pointed out by the literature as the most suitable for these children for being more social than competitive. It has recreational settings built with 2D graphic interface to keep the children’s attention and an access control and a register mechanism to allow the monitoring of the child’s progress. The data collection of the functional, nonfunctional, psychological, and educational requirements, as well as the evaluation of its consistency and usability, was made by a multidisciplinary team consisting of five experts in each of the following expertises: pedagogy, psychology, psychopedagogy, and game development. The effectiveness test of the game was performed by 10 children with ASD and 28 children with neurotypical development, which were separated into control and experimental groups, respectively. All experts and children with neurotypical development answered the System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire after playing the game. The results were positive, between experts and volunteers regarding their acceptance. However, the time of exposure to the game in children with ASD should be increased to effective assistance in the recognition of facial expressions.

Research Article

Knowledge Encoding in Game Mechanics: Transfer-Oriented Knowledge Learning in Desktop-3D and VR

Affine Transformations (ATs) are a complex and abstract learning content. Encoding the AT knowledge in Game Mechanics (GMs) achieves a repetitive knowledge application and audiovisual demonstration. Playing a serious game providing these GMs leads to motivating and effective knowledge learning. Using immersive Virtual Reality (VR) has the potential to even further increase the serious game’s learning outcome and learning quality. This paper compares the effectiveness and efficiency of desktop-3D and VR in respect to the achieved learning outcome. Also, the present study analyzes the effectiveness of an enhanced audiovisual knowledge encoding and the provision of a debriefing system. The results validate the effectiveness of the knowledge encoding in GMs to achieve knowledge learning. The study also indicates that VR is beneficial for the overall learning quality and that an enhanced audiovisual encoding has only a limited effect on the learning outcome.

Research Article

Real-Time Large Crowd Rendering with Efficient Character and Instance Management on GPU

Achieving the efficient rendering of a large animated crowd with realistic visual appearance is a challenging task when players interact with a complex game scene. We present a real-time crowd rendering system that efficiently manages multiple types of character data on the GPU and integrates seamlessly with level-of-detail and visibility culling techniques. The character data, including vertices, triangles, vertex normals, texture coordinates, skeletons, and skinning weights, are stored as either buffer objects or textures in accordance with their access requirements at the rendering stage. Our system preserves the view-dependent visual appearance of individual character instances in the crowd and is executed with a fine-grained parallelization scheme. We compare our approach with the existing crowd rendering techniques. The experimental results show that our approach achieves better rendering performance and visual quality. Our approach is able to render a large crowd composed of tens of thousands of animated instances in real time by managing each type of character data in a single buffer object.

Research Article

IMOVE: A Motion Tracking and Projection Framework for Social Interaction Applications

In public places such as malls, train stations, and airports, there is a constant flow of people either waiting or commuting. Even though people at these locations are surrounded by many other individuals, mostly there is little social interaction, which generally creates a gloomy atmosphere. Any applications promoting social interactions are a welcome addition. We present IMOVE, an interactive framework aimed at facilitating the development of such applications. It offers a combination of motion tracking and projection methods which makes it easier to create interactive experiences and games, tailored to motivate people to move around, explore, and, most importantly, interact with each other in a fun way. People moving around trigger events and effects, interacting with the applications using their body movements or even collaboratively working towards an outcome. IMOVE was validated by means of a variety of applications in a real scenario, the entrance hall of a busy public building: the classic Pong game, a collaborative and accessible casual game (Save the Turtles!), and a procedural visual art generator based on game mechanics (Light Trails). All applications have been successfully running for the past year. The IMOVE framework is freely available online and it has been shown to be particularly suited and accessible to novice game and interactive application developers for large public spaces.

International Journal of Computer Games Technology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision54 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore2.600
Impact Factor-
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