International Journal of Computer Games Technology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision54 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore3.700
Journal Citation Indicator0.410
Impact Factor-

An Inheritance Mode of Rural Cultural Heritage Based on Virtual Museum in China

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Computer Games Technology publishes original research and review articles on both the research and development aspects of games technology covering the whole range of entertainment computing and interactive digital media.

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International Journal of Computer Games Technology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Review Article

Localization Tools in General Purpose Game Engines: A Systematic Mapping Study

This paper addresses localization from a game development perspective by studying the state of tool support for a localization work in general purpose game engines. Using a systematic mapping study, the most commonly used game engines and their official tool libraries are studied. The results indicate that even though localization tools exists for the game engines included in the study, the visibility, availability, and functionality differ. Localization tools that are user facing, i.e., used to create localization, are scarce while many are tool facing, i.e., used to import localization kits made outside the production pipeline.

Research Article

Synchronous Remote Rendering for VR

Remote rendering for VR is a technology that enables high-quality VR on low-powered devices. This is realized by offloading heavy computation and rendering to high-powered servers that stream VR as video to the clients. This article focuses on one specific issue in remote rendering when imperfect frame timing between client and server may cause recurring frame drops. We propose a system design that executes synchronously and eliminates the aforementioned problem. The design is presented, and an implementation is tested using various networks and hardware. The design cannot drop frames due to synchronization issues but may on the other hand stall if temporal disturbances occur, e.g., due to network delay spikes or loss. However, experiments confirm that such events can remain rare given an appropriate environment. For example, remote rendering on an intranet at 90 fps with a server located approximately 50 km away yielded just 0.002% stalled frames while rendering with extra latency corresponding to the duration of exactly one frame (11.1 ms at 90 fps). In a LAN without extra latency setting, i.e., with latency equal to locally rendered VR, 0.009% stalls were observed while using a wired Ethernet connection and 0.058% stalls when using 5 GHz wireless IEEE 802.11 ac.

Review Article

Teaching Method for Software Measurement Process Based on Gamification or Serious Games: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Software process improvement programs are partly founded on software measurement. However, despite their importance, it has been pointed out in the literature that many students are leaving the academic world without the necessary skills to conduct this kind of process. This can be understood by people’s attitudes to this process which is regarded as time-consuming and difficult to understand—factors that explain the lack of interest in it during a student’s academic life. In light of this, the application of serious games or gamification can show useful alternative ways of meeting this need, because the strategies they involve are well accepted by students and have a motivational and engaging effect on them. The objective of this work is to discover different approaches to the teaching of software measurement and software process improvement through gamification projects and serious games. This involves carrying out a systematic review of the literature, which is aimed at characterizing the state-of-the-art on the use of methods related to gamification and serious games in the abovementioned subjects. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify primary studies that address the use, planning, or evaluation of gamification, serious games, their features, and game mechanics in software engineering. We located 137 primary studies, published between 2000 and 2019. Although the use of serious games and gamification in software engineering is not recent, there still remains a large area to be explored, especially in software process improvement and software measurement. The study expands and advances the research on how serious games and gamification proposals can be used for teaching software measurement in the context of software process improvement programs by conducting a systematic review of the literature.

Research Article

Team Sports for Game AI Benchmarking Revisited

Sport games are among the oldest and best established genres of computer games. Sport-inspired environments, such as RoboCup, have been used for AI benchmarking for years. We argue that, in spite of the rise of increasingly more sophisticated game genres, team sport games will remain an important testbed for AI benchmarking due to two primary factors. First, there are several genre-specific challenges for AI systems that are neither present nor emphasized in other types of games, such as team AI and frequent replanning. Second, there are unmistakable nonskill-related goals of AI systems, contributing to player enjoyment, that are most easily observed and addressed within a context of a team sport, such as showing creative and emotional traits. We analyze these factors in detail and outline promising directions for future research for game AI benchmarking, within a team sport context.

Research Article

A Study of Physical Fitness and Enjoyment on Virtual Running for Exergames

Virtual Reality (VR) technology has advanced forward in everyday life where virtual fitness is possible through physically moving around in the real world. Exergame is a video game for exercise aimed at making exercise more fun. VR exergame applies these trends together for virtual fitness with immersive game play. The VR locomotion is traveling in VR, which is commonly used in adventure role-playing games (RPG). Virtual running can be applied as a locomotion technique for VR exergames. The design of virtual running in VR exergames should be considered as an exercise for fitness and also for enjoyment. This paper proposed two motion-based locomotion techniques: ArmSwing and Squat for virtual running, which are considered as aerobic and strength exercise. These two postures were used to study how physical exertion affected players while interacting in the test scene. Usability, motion sickness, and enjoyment were assessed to analyze the differences of each posture. The results showed that motion sickness and enjoyment of ArmSwing and Squat were not different, while usability was different where ArmSwing was rated higher than Squat. The results from the interviews suggest that most players preferred aerobic exercise (ArmSwing) more than strength exercise (Squat) for a long period of exercise. However, for a short period of exercise, players preferred strength exercise more than aerobic exercise. The adventure-based RPG for exercise needs a solution design appropriate for virtual running in VR, and our results can be a guideline for developers in order to handle motion-based locomotion for VR exergames.

Research Article

Comparative Effectiveness of Simulation versus Serious Game for Training Nursing Students in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Control Trial

Background. The proper implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is crucial in saving patients. Purpose. This study was aimed at evaluating the difference in educating nursing students on CPR when using the traditional simulation training with a mannequin versus a more novel serious game training on the smartphone platform. Methods. This randomized control trial was conducted in 2018-2019. Through purposive sampling, 56 nursing students were selected and randomly assigned to three groups: a simulation-based CPR training, CPR training using a serious game on the smartphone platform, and a control group that received no CPR training. Each student was evaluated pre- and posttraining on CPR knowledge and skill. Results. Both the simulation and serious game training groups increased CPR abilities two weeks after training. The control group did not show improvement in skill or knowledge of CPR. The simulation and serious game intervention groups demonstrated better scores on the knowledge questionnaire and on the CPR skill demonstration in comparison to the control group. However, the simulation group and the serious game group showed no significant difference in knowledge ( vs. ; ) or CPR skill demonstration ( vs. ; ). The overall scores for CPR knowledge did not meet minimum expectations (70% score) in either the simulation (47.75%) or serious game (38.85%) group. However, both groups demonstrated adequate CPR skill on demonstration (simulation 87.64% and serious game 83.06%). Conclusions. Both the simulation and serious game training groups were found to increase CPR skill. CPR training would likely benefit from a multimodal approach to education.

International Journal of Computer Games Technology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision54 days
Acceptance to publication26 days
CiteScore3.700
Journal Citation Indicator0.410
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.