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International Journal of Computer Games Technology
Volume 2012, Article ID 596953, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/596953
Research Article

Pose Space Surface Manipulation

1School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Kanagawa 223-8522, Japan
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, Kanagawa 223-8522, Japan

Received 17 December 2011; Revised 10 February 2012; Accepted 24 February 2012

Academic Editor: Alexander Pasko

Copyright © 2012 Yusuke Yoshiyasu and Nobutoshi Yamazaki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Example-based mesh deformation techniques produce natural and realistic shapes by learning the space of deformations from examples. However, skeleton-based methods cannot manipulate a global mesh structure naturally, whereas the mesh-based approaches based on a translational control do not allow the user to edit a local mesh structure intuitively. This paper presents an example-driven mesh editing framework that achieves both global and local pose manipulations. The proposed system is built with a surface deformation method based on a two-step linear optimization technique and achieves direct manipulations of a model surface using translational and rotational controls. With the translational control, the user can create a model in natural poses easily. The rotational control can adjust the local pose intuitively by bending and twisting. We encode example deformations with a rotation-invariant mesh representation which handles large rotations in examples. To incorporate example deformations, we infer a pose from the handle translations/rotations and perform pose space interpolation, thereby avoiding involved nonlinear optimization. With the two-step linear approach combined with the proposed multiresolution deformation method, we can edit models at interactive rates without losing important deformation effects such as muscle bulging.