International Journal of Dentistry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore2.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor-

Article of the Year 2020

COVID-19: Changing Trends and Its Impact on Future of Dentistry

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Dentistry publishes original research articles and review articles in all areas of dentistry, including periodontal diseases, dental implants, oral pathology, as well as oral and maxillofacial surgery.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Dr Patricia Pereira, is based at the University of Florida, USA. Her main research interests are cosmetic and esthetic dentistry, involving direct and indirect bonded restorations.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

More articles
Review Article

Technique for Orthodontic Clinical Photographs Using a Smartphone

Smartphone cameras have advanced at a rapid rate. With this advancement, it is possible to take high quality orthodontic clinical photographs using a smartphone. The aim of this article is to describe the technique to take orthodontic clinical photographs using a smartphone.

Research Article

Team-Based Learning in Prosthodontics Courses: Students’ Satisfaction

The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess dental students’ satisfaction regarding team-based learning (TBL) methodology in prosthodontics courses taught at College of Dentistry, Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Saudi Arabia. Undergraduate dental students at second, third, fourth, and fifth years were taught prosthodontics courses through traditional and TBL pedagogies. TBL sessions consisted of preparation, readiness assurance, and application. At the end of each prosthodontics course, the students were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire that was divided into four sections to assess the effect of TBL on the following parameters: information acquisition, interpersonal skills improvement, classroom environment, and the students-instructors interaction. The responses of the questionnaire followed the Likert scoring method (scaled from 1 to 5). The t-test and ANOVA statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. Results. The response rate to the questionnaire was 86%. There were a significant relationship and correlation between TBL pedagogy and student satisfaction ( values ≤ 0.05) for all levels. The means of the responses for the second and fifth years were 4.36 and 4.56, respectively, where the means for the third and fourth years were 3.54 and 3.59, respectively. The parameter notably affected by TBL was interpersonal skills enhancement. All students strongly agreed that TBL enhances personal flexibility and boosts their self-esteem. Conclusion. Students showed positive perceptions about TBL pedagogy in terms of active engagement, knowledge acquisition, and improvement of interpersonal skills leading to more efficient learning outcome.

Research Article

Cytotoxicity of Dental Cements on Soft Tissue Associated with Dental Implants

Purpose. To investigate and compare the cellular host response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) on four currently used cements. Methods and Material. 5 cement pellet samples were made for each of the 4 test cements (n = 20). The cements used for this study were zinc phosphate, zinc oxide noneugenol (ZOE), RelyX U200, and glass ionomer cement (GIC). One commercially available cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of peri-implant tissues. Direct contact cell culture testing was conducted following International Organization for Standardization (ISO) methods 10993-5 and 10993-12 (MTT assay test). Cell cultures without dental cement were considered as control. Cells were allowed to grow and confluence over 48 hours after subcultivation according to standard laboratory procedures. The cells were kept in direct contact with the cement samples for 24 hours before being subjected to analysis. All specimens were tested in triplicate to validate the results. Quantitative evaluation of cytotoxicity was done to measure cell death and inhibition of cell growth. Results were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA (a = 0.05) followed by Tukey B post hoc test. Results. The results of the study showed that HGF was vulnerable to the dental cement test material. GIC, zinc phosphate, ZOE, and resin cement were cytotoxic in decreasing order, respectively, and significantly reduced the cell viability after exposure to HGF . Conclusions. Within the limitations of this in vitro cellular study, results indicated that the test dental cements were cytotoxic to HGF. The highest cytotoxicity was observed in GIC followed by zinc phosphate, ZOE, and resin cement.

Review Article

Supportive Home Remedies for Orofacial Pain during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: Their Value and Limitations

Background. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impeded access to timely dental care, and there is an urgent need for adjuvant therapies that can reduce orofacial pain in emergencies. Aims. To provide information on the benefits and limitations of eight representative home remedies as palliative care for orofacial pain during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods. PubMed and Medline were electronically searched for eight home remedies for orofacial pain that can be used in COVID-19. Papers published in English in the past 30 years were considered. Among the published studies suitable for the research purpose, those in which the abstract and body text were confirmed were targeted, and duplicate studies were excluded. Finally, 86 studies were included. Results. There is extensive and high-level scientific evidence for the application of tooth brushing and flossing, mouth rinsing with chlorhexidine, use of over-the-counter pain medication, and application of cryotherapy in emergencies. Gargling with salt water, brushing with bamboo salt, gargling with garlic juice, and oil pulling are traditional methods used for centuries. The use of natural products for orofacial pain has a significant empirical effect but has weak scientific evidence. Conclusions. Knowing the correct application method, effects, and side effects is desirable to use these methods appropriately in emergencies. However, scientific evidence is unclear and generally lacking for home remedies to be the main treatment strategy, and there are clear limitations to their use as a single main treatment.

Research Article

Effects of Periodontal Endoscopy-Assisted Nonsurgical Treatment of Periodontitis: Four-Month Results of a Randomized Controlled Split-Mouth Pilot Study

Objective. Although the therapeutic effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) are well established, the clinical benefits of the additional use of periodontal endoscopy (PE) remain controversial. Therefore, this randomized controlled split-mouth pilot study evaluated the effect of NSPT using PE versus NSPT without nPE on bleeding on probing (BOP) in sites with probing depth (PD)≥4 mm (primary outcome), PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), number of hard deposits (HDs), and treatment time per tooth (TrT). Methods. Two calibrated operators performed NSPT in twenty periodontitis patients, randomized into two quadrants for PE or nPE treatment. BOP, PD, and CAL were recorded at the first visit for NSPT (T0) and during reevaluation (T1: mean (SD) 119.7 (24.6) days after T0). The average TrT and the number of sites with HDs were documented at T0. Results. For BOP, no significant differences were found at the patient’s level (10/10 (male/female); aged 54.3 (10.9) years) neither within or between the groups. At tooth surface level, a lower number of surfaces with BOP was observed in nPE. CAL and PD improved significantly during NSPT in both groups , with higher PD reduction and CAL gain in nPE. There are significantly longer TrT and more surfaces with subgingival HDs evident in PE at T0 . Conclusion. Whereas subgingival HDs can be visually detected with PE during NSPT, no additional clinical benefits regarding BOP, PD, or CAL were notable compared to conventional systematic periodontal instrumentation. Additionally, PE-assisted NSPT required a longer treatment time.

Review Article

Vitamin D Supplementation for Prevention of Dental Implant Failure: A Systematic Review

Background. Many factors play a significant role in osseointegration and healing after dental implant insertion and restoration. Some factors are related to dental biomaterials, such as the dental implant, prosthesis, and grafting materials. Other factors can be connected to operator skills and accumulated experience. Local and systemic patient-related factors are crucial in determining the success of the dental implant. Thorough examination and analysis of local factors using available examination tools are vital to prepare the implant candidate for such treatment. The patient’s systemic condition directly affects the healing of the dental implant. One of the most overlooked systemic factors is the patients’ vitamin D level, which influences bone formation around the implant and subsequent osseointegration. The current review examined the available literature regarding the association between vitamin D supplementation and dental implant osseointegration. Methods. Data of this review were derived from recent research available on PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Inclusion criteria were the relation between the vitamin D serum and dental implant osseointegration or failure. The Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist was followed to perform the review. The study’s outcome was the need for vitamin D supplementation to prevent implant failure. Results. Five human studies (including case reports, case series, and retrospective studies) and six animal studies. All included studies discussed the relationship between vitamin D, early dental implant failure, and bone implant contact. Three retrospective studies found no significant relationship between vitamin D supplementation and EDIFs in humans. On the other hand, one retrospective study showed a significant relationship in humans. A case report and case series claimed that the implant was successfully placed after vitamin D supplementation. A total of four animal studies showed a significant relationship between vitamin D supplementation and osseointegration of the dental implant. Two animal studies showed no significant association. Conclusion. To ensure optimal treatment outcomes, it is recommended to supplement the patient with vitamin D if the serum level is not within the normal range. Further clinical studies and case reports are needed to confirm the association between serum vitamin D levels and osseointegration.

International Journal of Dentistry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore2.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.