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International Journal of Dentistry
Volume 2012, Article ID 578401, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/578401
Research Article

Dental Status and Associated Factors in a Dentate Adult Population in Bulgaria: A Cross-Sectional Survey

1Department of Prosthetic Dental Medicine, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Medical University-Sofia, 1, Georgi Sofiiski Boulevard, 1431 Sofia, Bulgaria
2Department of Oral Function and Prosthetic Dentistry, College of Dental Science, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 25 Philips van Leydenlaan, 6525 EX Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3Department of Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, College of Dental Science, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 25 Philips van Leydenlaan, 6525 EX Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Received 19 December 2011; Revised 24 February 2012; Accepted 24 February 2012

Academic Editor: Michael E. Razzoog

Copyright © 2012 Nikola D. Damyanov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study aimed to determine variations in the dental status of a dentate adult population in terms of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth in relation to several sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Quota sampling was used to draw 2531 subjects aged 20 years and over. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and an oral examination. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to observe associations between “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth and the factors of interest. The mean numbers of “decayed,” “missing,” and “filled” teeth were 2.2, 6.7, and 4.9, respectively. Molar teeth were significantly more often “missing” than premolar and anterior teeth. Age, gender, education, and tooth brushing revealed most noticeable associations. Increasing age was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “filled” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “missing” teeth. Females were more likely to have “missing” and “filled” teeth. Higher education was associated with a lower chance of having “missing” teeth. More frequent tooth brushing was associated with a lower chance of having “decayed” and “missing” teeth, but with a higher chance of having “filled” teeth. These risk indicators should be considered in prevention program planning if reduction of tooth loss is to be achieved.