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International Journal of Dentistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 565102, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/565102
Clinical Study

Salivary Cortisol as a Biomarker to Explore the Role of Maternal Stress in Early Childhood Caries

1Division of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, P.O. Box 84891, Riyadh 11681, Saudi Arabia
2Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, P.O. Box 84891, Riyadh 11681, Saudi Arabia

Received 28 December 2012; Accepted 14 May 2013

Academic Editor: Marilia Buzalaf

Copyright © 2013 Sharat Chandra Pani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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