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International Journal of Dentistry
Volume 2013, Article ID 841840, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/841840
Review Article

The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

Department of Orthodontics, University Medical Center Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg, Germany

Received 6 June 2013; Accepted 16 September 2013

Academic Editor: Stephen Richmond

Copyright © 2013 A. Niklas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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