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International Journal of Dentistry
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 452413, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/452413
Research Article

Impact of Digital Panoramic Radiograph Magnification on Vertical Measurement Accuracy

1Oral Surgery and Implantology Unit, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, rue Barthélemy-Menn 19, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
2Ardentis Clinique Dentaire Lausanne SA, Swiss Dental Clinics Group, voie du Chariot 6, 1003 Lausanne, Switzerland
3Department of Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University Clinics of Dental Medicine, University of Geneva, rue Barthélemy-Menn 19, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
4Department of Health and Community Medicine, Center of Clinical Research and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, rue Barthélemy-Menn 19, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
5Department of Orofacial Rehabilitation, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University Clinics of Dental Medicine, University of Geneva, rue Barthélemy-Menn 19, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland

Received 9 July 2015; Revised 29 September 2015; Accepted 1 October 2015

Academic Editor: Manuel Lagravere

Copyright © 2015 Marc El Hage et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this panoramic radiography study was to assess the impact of image magnification on the accuracy of vertical measurements in the posterior mandible. Methods. Six dental implants, inserted in the posterior segments of a resin model, were used as reference objects. Two observers performed implant length measurements using a proprietary viewer with two preset image magnifications: the low (1.9 : 1) and the medium (3.4 : 1) image magnifications. They also measured the implant lengths in two Digital Imaging Communications in Medicine viewers set at low (1.9 : 1), medium (3.4 : 1), and high (10 : 1) image magnifications. Results. The error between the measured length and the real implant length was close to zero for all three viewers and image magnifications. The percentage of measurements equal to the real implant length was the highest (83.3%) for the high image magnification and below 30% for all viewers with the low image magnification. Conclusions. The high and medium image magnifications used in this study allowed accurate vertical measurements, with all three imaging programs, in the posterior segments of a mandibular model. This study suggests that a low image magnification should not be used for vertical measurements on digital panoramic radiographs when planning an implant in the posterior mandible.