Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Differential Equations
Volume 2015, Article ID 580741, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/580741
Research Article

Numerical Solution of Riccati Equations by the Adomian and Asymptotic Decomposition Methods over Extended Domains

1Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematical Sciences, University of Guilan, P.O. Box 41335-1914, Rasht, Iran
2Department of Mathematics, Rasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 41335-3516, Rasht, Iran
3Department of Mathematics, Guilan Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Rasht, Iran

Received 8 July 2015; Accepted 27 August 2015

Academic Editor: Timothy R. Marchant

Copyright © 2015 Jafar Biazar and Mohsen Didgar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We combine the Adomian decomposition method (ADM) and Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method (AADM) for solving Riccati equations. We investigate the approximate global solution by matching the near-field approximation derived from the Adomian decomposition method with the far-field approximation derived from Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method for Riccati equations and in such cases when we do not find any region of overlap between the obtained approximate solutions by the two proposed methods, we connect the two approximations by the Padé approximant of the near-field approximation. We illustrate the efficiency of the technique for several specific examples of the Riccati equation for which the exact solution is known in advance.

1. Introduction

It is well known that the Riccati equation asfinds surprisingly many applications in physics and mathematics such as random processes, optimal control, and diffusion problems [1]. In fact, the Riccati equation naturally arises in many fields of quantum mechanics, such as in quantum chemistry [2], the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation [3], and super symmetry theories [4]. In addition, the Riccati equation plays a prominent role in variational calculus [5], nonlinear physics [6], renormalization group equations for coupling constants in quantum field theories [7, 8], and thermodynamics [9]. It is well known that one-dimensional static Schrödinger equation is closely related to the Riccati equation. Solitary wave solutions of a nonlinear partial differential equation can be expressed as a polynomial in two elementary functions satisfying a projective Riccati equation [10]. Beside important engineering and scientific applications that are well known, the newer applications include areas such as mathematical finance [11, 12].

Adomian and his coauthors have presented a systematic methodology for practical solution of linear or nonlinear and deterministic or stochastic operator equations, including algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, and integral and integrodifferential equations [1318]. Adomian decomposition method is a powerful technique, which provides efficient algorithms for analytic approximate solutions and numerical simulations for real-world applications in the applied sciences and engineering. Using the ADM, we calculate a series solution, but, in practice, we approximate the solution by a truncated series. The series sometimes coincides with the Taylor expansion of the exact solution in the neighborhood of the point . Although the series can be rapidly convergent in a small region, it has a slower convergence rate in the wider region.

Several investigators have proposed a variety of approaches to solve the Riccati equation, approximately [1924]. In order to obtain the global approximate solution of the Riccati equation, we combine the Padé approximant of the near-field approximation as derived from the ADM with the far-field approximation as derived from the AADM [2528] to overcome the difficulty of a finite domain of convergence. Adomian introduced a variation of his decomposition method in [25] that can be used to obtain the asymptotic value of solutions. In this method, the recursion is the same as that in the ADM, but it uses a different canonical form of the differential equation such that it yields to a steady state solution of the equation. In fact, rather than nested integrations as in decomposition, we have nested differentiations, which will be expounded later. Haldar and Datta [29] applied the AADM to calculate integrals neither expressible in terms of elementary functions nor adequately tabulated.

This paper is arranged as follows. In the next section, we present a brief review of the ADM for nonlinear IVPs. In Section 3, we present a description of the AADM for solving the Riccati equation. In Section 4, we investigate several numerical examples. In Section 5, we present our conclusions and summarize our findings.

2. Review of the Adomian Decomposition Method

We review the salient features of the Adomian decomposition method in solving IVPs for first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations aswhere the functions , , and are analytic.

We rewrite (2) in Adomian’s usual operator-theoretic formwhere and then , , and . Next we rewrite (3) asand we apply the integral operator to both sides of (4):where since . In the case of a first-order ordinary differential equation, we have . ThereforeFor the sake of simplicity, we define the function as , and then, upon substitution, we obtainIn the ADM, the solution is represented by a series; sayand the nonlinearity comprises the Adomian polynomialswhereis called an Adomian polynomial, which were first defined by Adomian [13] asFor convenient reference, we list the first five Adomian polynomials

Several algorithms for the Adomian polynomials have been developed by Rach [30, 31], Adomian and Rach [32], Wazwaz [33], Biazar et al. [34], and several others. New, efficient algorithms with their subroutines written in Mathematica for rapid computer-generation of the Adomian polynomials have been provided by Duan in [3537].

From (7)–(9) the solution components are determined by the classic Adomian recursion scheme:Thus the -term approximation as obtained from the ADM can serve as the near-field approximation of the solution , where is in the neighborhood of the initial point .

We remark that the convergence of the Adomian decomposition series has been previously proven by several researchers [30, 3841]. For example, Abdelrazec and Pelinovsky [41] have recently published a rigorous proof of convergence for the ADM in accordance with the Cauchy-Kovalevskaya theorem.

3. Description of Adomian’s Asymptotic Decomposition Method

In this section, we advocate Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method for solving the Riccati equation. We remark that Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method does not need use of the initial condition to obtain the asymptotic solution or the solution in the large, which is another, convenient advantage in computations using this technique. Rather than nested integrations as required by decomposition, we now have nested differentiations. In effect our aim is to solve for the solution by not inverting the linear differential operator , but instead by decomposing the nonlinear operator and hence determining the asymptotic solution . Toward this end, we rewrite (1) asFor the case when the coefficient , we can divide both sides of (14) by , and we haveSubstituting the respective decomposition series (i.e., and ), we obtainfrom which we design the asymptotic recursion schemeWe note that the Adomian polynomials for the quadratic nonlinearity areUsing the form of the Adomian polynomials in (19), we rewrite the recursion schemes (17) and (18) asIn view of (21) and after appropriate manipulations, we obtainConsequently, with this result, the solution components are given by the following recursion scheme:Thus the obtained -terms asymptotic approximation for the Riccati equation can serve as the far-field approximation, where is far from the initial point .

4. Numerical Examples

In this section, several numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of our technique as presented in this paper. We remark that all calculations are performed by Mathematica package 8.

Example 1. Consider the following Riccati equation:subject to initial condition .
The exact solution is known in advance to beIn Adomian’s operator notation, we havewhere , , and .
To apply Adomian decomposition method, equation (26) should be written as the following,Applying the inverse operator to both sides yieldsNext we consider the solution as a series and the nonlinearity , and upon substitution, we obtainThe components of the series solution are given by the recursion schemeThe first few components are as follows:The partial sums of the Adomian decomposition series can serve as a near-field approximate solution.
Solving (26) by Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method, we first rewrite it asNext we assume the series and the nonlinearity .
Upon substitution and using the form of the Adomian polynomials in (19), we obtain the solution components of the far-field approximation according to the recursion scheme (23)from which we conclude that is the slant asymptote of the exact solution; that is, .
Computation shows that this Adomian decomposition series has a finite radius of convergence. By plotting the curves of and for several values of and , we do not find any regions of overlap. In this case, we connect the two approximations by the Padé approximant of or simply replace by its Padé approximant and then match the Padé approximant with . For example, we investigate and . The curves of the near-field approximation , the far-field approximation , and the exact solution are plotted in Figure 1.
We calculated the Padé approximant by Mathematica and found that the Padé approximant and the far-field approximation overlap in the approximate region ; see Figure 2. Thus we can match them aswhich is a global approximation, where belongs to the region of overlap and is the unit step function; that is,

Figure 1: The near-field approximation (dot-dashed line), far-field approximation (dashed line), and exact solution (solid line).
Figure 2: The Padé approximant (dot-dashed line), far-field approximation (dashed line), and exact solution (solid line).

Example 2. Consider the following Riccati equation:with the initial value .
The exact solution is known in advance to beBy the Adomian decomposition method and applying the integral operator , we haveAs before, we decompose and asThus the solution components of the near-field approximation are determined recursively asBy Adomian’s asymptotic decomposition method according to the recursion scheme (23), the solution components of the far-field approximation are computed as from which we conclude that is the horizontal asymptote of the exact solution when the independent variable approaches infinity.
The curves of the near-field approximation , the far-field approximation , and the exact solution are plotted in Figure 3.
We calculated the Padé approximant by Mathematica and found that the Padé approximant and the far-field approximation overlap almost in the approximate region ; see Figure 4. Thus we can match them aswhich is a global approximation, where belongs to the region of overlap.

Figure 3: The near-field approximation (dot-dashed line), far-field approximation (dashed line), and exact solution (solid line).
Figure 4: The Padé approximant (dot-dashed line), far-field approximation (dashed line), and exact solution (solid line).

5. Conclusion

In this work, we combined the ADM and the AADM to approximate the global solution of the Riccati equation. We evaluated the approximate solution by matching the Padé approximant of the near-field approximation derived from the ADM with the far-field approximation derived from the AADM. Furthermore we have shown that the AADM can be an important complement in analysis of the solution’s asymptote.

Conflict of Interests

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper.

References

  1. W. T. Reid, Riccati Differential Equations, Academic Press, New York, NY, USA, 1972. View at MathSciNet
  2. E. S. Fraga, The Schrödinger and Riccati Equations, vol. 70 of Lecture Notes in Chemistry, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 1999.
  3. R. Shankar, Principles of Quantum Mechanics, Plenum, New York, NY, USA, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. A. Khare and U. Sukhatme, Supersymmetry in Quantum Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 2001.
  5. M. I. Zelekin, Homogeneous Spaces and Riccati Equation in Variational Calculus, Factorial, Moscow, Russia, 1998, (Russian).
  6. V. B. Matveev and M. A. Salle, Darboux Transformations and Solitons, Springer Series in Nonlinear Dynamics, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  7. I. L. Buchbinder, S. D. Odintsov, and I. L. Shapiro, Effective Action in Quantum Gravity, IOP Publishing, 1992.
  8. K. Milton, S. D. Odintsov, and S. Zerbini, “Bulk versus brane running couplings,” Physical Review D, vol. 65, Article ID 065012, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. H. C. Rosu and F. A. de la Cruz, “One-parameter Darboux-transformed quantum actions in thermodynamics,” Physica Scripta, In press.
  10. J. F. Cariñena, G. Marmo, A. M. Perelomov, and M. F. Rañada, “Related operators and exact solutions of Schrödinger equations,” International Journal of Modern Physics A, vol. 13, no. 28, pp. 4913–4929, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  11. B. D. Anderson and J. B. Moore, Optimal Control-Linear Quadratic Methods, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, USA, 1999.
  12. I. Lasiecka and R. Triggiani, Differential and Algebraic Riccati Equations with Application to Boundary/Point Control Problems: Continuous Theory and Approximation Theory, vol. 164 of Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  13. G. Adomian, Nonlinear Stochastic Operator Equations, Academic Press, Orlando, Fla, USA, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  14. G. Adomian and R. Rach, “On linear and nonlinear integro-differential equations,” Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, vol. 113, no. 1, pp. 199–201, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  15. G. Adomian, Solving Frontier Problems of Physics: The Decomposition Method, Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  16. G. Adomian and R. Rach, “On the solution of algebraic equations by the decomposition method,” Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, vol. 105, no. 1, pp. 141–166, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at Scopus
  17. A. M. Wazwaz, Partial Differential Equations and Solitary Waves Theory, Higher Education Press, Beijing, China, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  18. A.-M. Wazwaz, Linear and Nonlinear Integral Equations: Methods and Applications, Higher Education Press, Beijing, China, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  19. H. Bulut and D. J. Evans, “On the solution of the Riccati equation by the decomposition method,” International Journal of Computer Mathematics, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 103–109, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  20. M. A. El-Tawil, A. A. Bahnasawi, and A. Abdel-Naby, “Solving Riccati differential equation using Adomian's decomposition method,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 157, no. 2, pp. 503–514, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  21. P.-Y. Tsai and C.-K. Chen, “An approximate analytic solution of the nonlinear Riccati differential equation,” Journal of the Franklin Institute, vol. 347, no. 10, pp. 1850–1862, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  22. A. R. Vahidi and M. Didgar, “An improved method for determining the solution of Riccati equations,” Neural Computing and Applications, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 1229–1237, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. R. Vahidi, Z. Azimzadeh, and M. Didgar, “An efficient method for solving Riccati equation using homotopy perturbation method,” Indian Journal of Physics, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 447–454, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. A. R. Vahidi, M. Didgar, and R. C. Rach, “An improved approximate analytic solution for Riccati equations over extended intervals,” Indian Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 27–38, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  25. G. Adomian, “An investigation of the asymptotic decomposition method for nonlinear equations in physics,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 1–17, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  26. G. Adomian, “An adaptation of the decomposition method for asymptotic solutions,” Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 325–329, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  27. G. Adomian, “Solving the nonlinear equations of physics,” Computers & Mathematics with Applications, vol. 16, no. 10-11, pp. 903–914, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  28. R. Rach and J.-S. Duan, “Near-field and far-field approximations by the Adomian and asymptotic decomposition methods,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 217, no. 12, pp. 5910–5922, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  29. K. Haldar and B. K. Datta, “Integrations by asymptotic decomposition,” Applied Mathematics Letters, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 81–83, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  30. R. C. Rach, “A new definition of the Adomian polynomials,” Kybernetes, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 910–955, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  31. R. Rach, “A convenient computational form for the Adomian polynomials,” Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, vol. 102, no. 2, pp. 415–419, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  32. G. Adomian and R. Rach, “Generalization of Adomian polynomials to functions of several variables,” Computers & Mathematics with Applications, vol. 24, no. 5-6, pp. 11–24, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  33. A.-M. Wazwaz, “A new algorithm for calculating Adomian polynomials for nonlinear operators,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 111, no. 1, pp. 53–69, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  34. J. Biazar, E. Babolian, G. Kember, A. Nouri, and R. Islam, “An alternate algorithm for computing Adomian polynomials in special cases,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 138, no. 2-3, pp. 523–529, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  35. J.-S. Duan, “Recurrence triangle for Adomian polynomials,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 216, no. 4, pp. 1235–1241, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  36. J.-S. Duan, “An efficient algorithm for the multivariable Adomian polynomials,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 217, no. 6, pp. 2456–2467, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  37. J.-S. Duan, “Convenient analytic recurrence algorithms for the Adomian polynomials,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 217, no. 13, pp. 6337–6348, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  38. Y. Cherruault and G. Adomian, “Decomposition methods: a new proof of convergence,” Mathematical and Computer Modelling, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 103–106, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  39. K. Abbaoui and Y. Cherruault, “Convergence of Adomian's method applied to differential equations,” Computers & Mathematics with Applications, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 103–109, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  40. K. Abbaoui and Y. Cherruault, “New ideas for proving convergence of decomposition methods,” Computers & Mathematics with Applications, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 103–108, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus
  41. A. Abdelrazec and D. Pelinovsky, “Convergence of the Adomian decomposition method for initial-value problems,” Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 749–766, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet · View at Scopus