International Journal of Endocrinology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate35%
Submission to final decision48 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore3.500
Impact Factor2.299

Incidence and Factors Associated with Postoperative Delayed Hyponatremia after Transsphenoidal Pituitary Surgery: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

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International Journal of Endocrinology publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies that provide insights into the endocrine system and its associated diseases at a genomic, molecular, biochemical and cellular level.

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International Journal of Endocrinology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

A Nomogram Model that Predicts the Risk of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Study

Objective. To construct a novel nomogram model that predicts the risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN) incidence in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. Questionnaire surveys, physical examinations, routine blood tests, and biochemical index evaluations were conducted on 1095 patients with T2DM from Guilin. A least absolute contraction selection operator (LASSO) regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to screen out DN risk factors. A logistic regression analysis incorporating the screened risk factors was used to establish a predictive nomogram model. The performance of the nomogram model was evaluated using the C-index, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), calibration plots, and a decision curve analysis. Bootstrapping was applied for internal validation. Results. Independent predictors for DN incidence risk included gender, age, hypertension, medicine use, duration of diabetes, body mass index, blood urea nitrogen level, serum creatinine level, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, and red blood cell distribution width. The nomogram model exhibited moderate prediction ability with a C-index of 0.819 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.783–0.853) and an AUC of 0.813 (95%CI: 0.778–0.848). The C-index from internal validation reached 0.796 (95%CI: 0.763–0.829). The decision curve analysis displayed that the DN risk nomogram was clinically applicable when the risk threshold was between 1 and 83%. Conclusion. Our novel and simple nomogram containing 10 factors may be useful in predicting DN incidence risk in T2DM patients.

Review Article

Diabetes Mellitus and COVID-19: Associations and Possible Mechanisms

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a recently emerged disease with formidable infectivity and high mortality. Emerging data suggest that diabetes is one of the most prevalent comorbidities in patients with COVID-19. Although their causal relationship has not yet been investigated, preexisting diabetes can be considered as a risk factor for the adverse outcomes of COVID-19. Proinflammatory state, attenuation of the innate immune response, possibly increased level of ACE2, along with vascular dysfunction, and prothrombotic state in people with diabetes probably contribute to higher susceptibility for SARS-CoV-2 infection and worsened prognosis. On the other hand, activated inflammation, islet damage induced by virus infection, and treatment with glucocorticoids could, in turn, result in impaired glucose regulation in people with diabetes, thus working as an amplification loop to aggravate the disease. Therefore, glycemic management in people with COVID-19, especially in those with severe illness, is of considerable importance. The insights may help to reduce the fatality in the effort against COVID-19.

Research Article

Circulating Prokineticin 2 Levels Are Increased in Children with Obesity and Correlated with Insulin Resistance

Objective. Prokineticin 2 (PK2) has been shown to regulate food intake, fat production, and the inflammation process, which play vital roles in the pathogenesis of obesity. The first aim of this study was to investigate serum PK2 levels in children with obesity and normal-weight children. The second aim was to compare the levels of PK2 between children with obesity, with and without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods. Seventy normal-weight children and 91 children with obesity (22 with NAFLD) were recruited. Circulating PK2, IL-6, and TNF-α were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements related to adiposity, lipid profile, and insulin resistance were examined for all participants. Results. Serum PK2 was significantly higher in children with obesity than in the normal-weight controls. Circulating PK2 levels were not different between the patients with and without NAFLD. Circulating PK2 was positively correlated with BMI, BMI z-score, insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Binary logistic regression revealed that the odds ratios for obesity were significantly elevated with increasing PK2. Conclusions. PK2 was strongly associated with obesity, and it may also be related to metabolic disorders and insulin resistance. This trial is registered with ChiCTR2000038838.

Research Article

Advancing the Understanding of Vitamin D Status in Post-Thyroidectomy Hypocalcemia

Background. Post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia is the most common complication after total thyroidectomy. Studies to examine the role of low vitamin D in increasing post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia incidence have produced varying results. This study aimed to assess whether vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia. Methods. This retrospective study involved 244 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy between 2014 and 2019. Patients were divided into two groups based on pre-operative vitamin D levels. Group A and Group B had pre-operative vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels of ≥20 ng/ml and <20 ng/ml (reference range for vitamin D is 30–100 ng/dl). The effect of vitamin D, gender, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity on post-operative calcium and PTH levels was analyzed. Results. Post-operative calcium levels for Group A were not statistically different compared to Group B (8.52 ± 0.64 mg/dl vs. 8.45 ± 0.58 mg/dl (mean ± S.D.; value = 0.352). The average post-operative PTH of the two groups did not differ significantly (Group A: 32.4 ± 27.5 pg/ml; Group B: 34.4 ± 41.7 pg/ml; value = 0.761). Conclusion. Pre-operative vitamin D levels are not predictive of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia.

Research Article

Risk Factors for Severe Hypocalcemia in Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism after Total Parathyroidectomy

Background. Hypocalcemia is the most common complication of total parathyroidectomy in secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and is associated with adverse consequences such as spasms, epilepsy, and arrhythmia and even death if the serum calcium level decreases rapidly. Previous studies have identified several risk factors for postoperative severe hypocalcemia (SH) in patients with SHPT, but the sample sizes were small and thus the results may not be reliable. Objectives. This study was performed to investigate the risk factors for SH after total parathyroidectomy without autotransplantation (tPTX) in a large sample of patients with uremic hyperparathyroidism. Methods. We retrospectively investigated the records of 1,095 patients with SHPT treated with tPTX between January 2008 and December 2018. Based on the postoperative serum calcium concentration, the patients were grouped into SH and non-SH groups. The clinical characteristics and biochemical results were analyzed, and binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for SH. Results. After surgery, 25.9% of the patients developed SH. Age, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate, frequency of bone pain, weight of resected glands, preoperative serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hemoglobin levels differed between the two groups. Binary logistic regression analyses identified preoperative serum calcium, iPTH, and ALP levels as independent predictors of SH after surgery. Conclusions. The preoperative serum calcium, iPTH, and ALP levels can be used to assess the risk of postoperative SH in patients with SHPT. Such patients should thus be monitored closely in order to initiate prompt interventions to avoid SH.

Research Article

Evaluation of Thyroid Function in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

Background. Thyroid hormones (TH) are crucial for cardiovascular homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that acute cardiovascular conditions, particularly acute heart failure (AHF), significantly impair the thyroid axis. Our aim was to evaluate the association of thyroid function with cardiovascular parameters and short- and long-term clinical outcomes in AHF patients. Methods. We performed a single-centre retrospective cohort study including patients hospitalized for AHF between January 2012 and December 2017. We used linear, logistic, and Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyse the association of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) with inpatient cardiovascular parameters, in-hospital mortality, short-term adverse clinical outcomes, and long-term mortality. Two models were used: (1) unadjusted, and (2) adjusted for age and sex. Results. Of the 235 patients included, 59% were female, and the mean age was 77.5 (SD 10.4) years. In the adjusted model, diastolic blood pressure was positively associated with TSH [β = 2.68 (0.27 to 5.09); ]; left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was negatively associated with FT4 [β = -24.85 (-47.87 to -1.82); ]; and a nonsignificant trend for a positive association was found between 30-day all-cause mortality and FT4 [OR = 3.40 (0.90 to 12.83); ]. Among euthyroid participants, higher FT4 levels were significantly associated with a higher odds of 30-day all-cause death [OR = 4.40 (1.06 to 18.16); ]. Neither TSH nor FT4 levels were relevant predictors of long-term mortality in the adjusted model. Conclusions. Thyroid function in AHF patients is associated with blood pressure and LVEF during hospitalization. FT4 might be useful as a biomarker of short-term adverse outcomes in these patients.

International Journal of Endocrinology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate35%
Submission to final decision48 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore3.500
Impact Factor2.299
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