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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 759234, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/759234
Review Article

Impact of Sleep and Its Disturbances on Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity

Sleep, Chronobiology and Neuroendocrinology Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

Received 11 December 2009; Accepted 27 March 2010

Academic Editor: Deborah Suchecki

Copyright © 2010 Marcella Balbo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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