Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2012, Article ID 469235, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/469235
Review Article

Aging and Bone Health in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

1Metabolism Unit, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
2Department of Neurology and Neurodevelopment, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 801 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
3Receptor Pharmacology Unit, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA

Received 30 March 2012; Accepted 17 May 2012

Academic Editor: Huan Cai

Copyright © 2012 Joan Jasien et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Low bone mass density (BMD), a classical age-related health issue and a known health concern for fair skinned, thin, postmenopausal Caucasian women, is found to be common among individuals with developmental/intellectual disabilities (D/IDs). It is the consensus that BMD is decreased in both men and women with D/ID. Maintaining good bone health is important for this population as fractures could potentially go undetected in nonverbal individuals, leading to increased morbidity and a further loss of independence. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of bone health of adults with D/ID, their risk of fractures, and how this compares to the general aging population. We will specifically focus on the bone health of two common developmental disabilities, Down syndrome (DS) and cerebral palsy (CP), and will discuss BMD and fracture rates in these complex populations. Gaining a greater understanding of how bone health is affected in individuals with D/ID could lead to better customized treatments for these specific populations.