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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2012, Article ID 637825, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/637825
Research Article

Compromised Rat Testicular Antioxidant Defence System by Hypothyroidism before Puberty

1Departments of Zoology and Biotechnology, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar, 751004 Orissa, India
2KTRDC, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0236, USA

Received 25 July 2011; Accepted 10 October 2011

Academic Editor: Daniela Jezova

Copyright © 2012 Dipak K. Sahoo and Anita Roy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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