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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013, Article ID 436252, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/436252
Research Article

Brain Levels of Prostaglandins, Endocannabinoids, and Related Lipids Are Affected by Mating Strategies

1Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, 1101 East 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
2Department of Psychology, The University at Albany, SUNY, 1400 Washington Ave, Albany, NY 12222, USA
3Department of Chemistry, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 900 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775-6160, USA

Received 19 July 2013; Accepted 19 September 2013

Academic Editor: Rosaria Meccariello

Copyright © 2013 Jordyn M. Stuart et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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