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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013, Article ID 510540, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/510540
Review Article

The Endocannabinoid System in the Postimplantation Period: A Role during Decidualization and Placentation

1Biologia da Inflamação e Reprodução, Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular (IBMC), Rua do Campo Alegre No. 823, 4150-180 Porto, Portugal
2Laboratório de Bioquímica, Departamento Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade do Porto, Ciências Biológicas Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira No. 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal

Received 18 July 2013; Accepted 4 September 2013

Academic Editor: Haibin Wang

Copyright © 2013 B. M. Fonseca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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