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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 701967, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/701967
Review Article

Diet-Regulated Anxiety

Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK

Received 4 June 2013; Accepted 11 July 2013

Academic Editor: Carlos Dieguez

Copyright © 2013 Michelle Murphy and Julian G. Mercer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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