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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 191247, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/191247
Research Article

Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

1Endocrinology Division, University Hospital “Dr. José E. González”, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Nuevo León, Francisco I. Madero and Gonzalitos s/n, 64460 Monterrey, NL, Mexico
2Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, University Hospital “Dr. José E. González”, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Nuevo León, Francisco I. Madero and Gonzalitos s/n, 64460 Monterrey, NL, Mexico
3Clinical Research Unit, University Hospital “Dr. José E. González”, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Nuevo León, Francisco I. Madero and Gonzalitos s/n, 64460 Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Received 4 September 2014; Revised 2 November 2014; Accepted 3 November 2014; Published 23 November 2014

Academic Editor: Mario Maggi

Copyright © 2014 René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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