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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014, Article ID 210528, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/210528
Research Article

Current Iodine Nutrition Status and Awareness of Iodine Deficiency in Tuguegarao, Philippines

1Department of Internal Medicine, Kosin University College of Medicine, 262 Gamcheon-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
2Department of Biochemistry, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
3Cancer Research Institute, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
4Department of Microbiology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
5Institute for International Healthcare Cooperation, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
6Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan 602-703, Republic of Korea
7Department of Chemistry, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA
8Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Pusan National University, Busan 609-838, Republic of Korea
9Department of Pharmacology and Biochemistry, Cagayan State University, College of Medicine, 3500 Tuguegarao, Philippines

Received 26 June 2014; Revised 10 September 2014; Accepted 12 September 2014; Published 13 October 2014

Academic Editor: Alexander Schreiber

Copyright © 2014 Bu Kyung Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The Philippines is one of the countries where adequate iodine status has been achieved. However, iodine deficiency still remains an important public health problem in this country. In this study, we evaluated iodine nutrition status and investigated an awareness status of iodine deficiency targeting high school students of Tuguegarao, Philippines. A total of 260 students provided samples for urinary iodine analysis, among which 146 students completed thyroid volume measurement by ultrasonography and answering the questionnaires. The median urinary iodine level was 355.3 µg/L and only 3.8% of the students were in the range of iodine deficiency status according to the ICCIDD criteria. Although 62.3% of students answered that they can list problems resulting from iodine deficiency, a majority of students (70.5%) were unable to identify problems other than goiter. They did not appreciate that adequate iodine levels are important during pregnancy and for development of children. 33.6% of students answered that they did not use iodized salt and the biggest reason was that they did not find it necessary. Based on these results, we suggest that a future strategy should be focused on vulnerable groups to completely eliminate iodine deficiency, including women at their reproductive ages and during pregnancy.