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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 270213, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/270213
Research Article

Effects of Recombinant Human Thyrotropin Administration on 24-Hour Arterial Pressure in Female Undergoing Evaluation for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

1Endocrine Unit, Department Medical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, 80 Vass Sofias Avenue, 11528 Athens, Greece
2Endocrine Unit, Evgenidion Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, 80 Vass Sofias Avenue, Athens, Greece
3Hypertension Unit, Department of Medical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, 80 Vass Sofias Avenue, 11528 Athens, Greece
4Vascular Laboratory, Department of Medical Therapeutics, Alexandra Hospital, Athens University School of Medicine, 80 Vass Sofias Avenue, 11528 Athens, Greece

Received 17 February 2014; Revised 28 July 2014; Accepted 29 July 2014; Published 18 August 2014

Academic Editor: Mario Maggi

Copyright © 2014 Gianna Rentziou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Thyroid-stimulating-hormone (TSH) receptors are expressed in endothelial cells. We investigated whether elevated TSH levels after acute recombinant TSH (rhTSH) administration may result in alterations in blood pressure (BP) in premenopausal women with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Designs. Thirty euthyroid DTC female patients were evaluated by rhTSH stimulation test (mean age years). A 24 h ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) monitoring (24 hr ABPM) was performed on days 2-3(D2-3). TSH was measured on day 1(D1), day 3(D3), and day 5(D5). Central blood pressure was evaluated on D3. Twenty-three patients were studied 1–4 weeks earlier (basal measurements). Results. TSH levels were D1: median 0.2 mU/L, D3: median 115.0 mU/L, and D5: median 14.6 mU/L. There were no significant associations between TSH on D1 and D3 and any BP measurements. Median D5 office-SBP and 24 h SBP, DBP, and central SBP were correlated with D5-TSH (). In those where a basal 24 h ABPM had been performed median pulse pressure was higher after rhTSH-test (). Conclusions. TSH, when acutely elevated, may slightly increase SBP, DBP, and central SBP. This agrees with previous reports showing positive associations of BP with TSH.