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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 483718, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/483718
Research Article

Behavioural Outcome in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Experience of a Single Centre

1Department of Paediatrics, Hospital Putrajaya, Pusat Pentadbiran Putrajaya, Presinct 7, 62250 Putrajaya, Malaysia
2Department of Paediatrics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) Jalan Yaacob Latiff, Bandar Tun Razak, Cheras, 56000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 19 October 2013; Revised 13 February 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 1 April 2014

Academic Editor: Maria L. Dufau

Copyright © 2014 Arini Nuran Idris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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