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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2014, Article ID 916918, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/916918
Research Article

Effects of Maternal Hypoxia during Pregnancy on Bone Development in Offspring: A Guinea Pig Model

1Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, City East Campus, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
2Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia

Received 10 January 2014; Revised 9 April 2014; Accepted 10 April 2014; Published 14 May 2014

Academic Editor: Andreas Höflich

Copyright © 2014 Alice M. C. Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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