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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 149826, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/149826
Research Article

Consequence of Menin Deficiency in Mouse Adipocytes Derived by In Vitro Differentiation

Metabolic Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 3 April 2015; Revised 17 June 2015; Accepted 18 June 2015

Academic Editor: Ludwik K. Malendowicz

Copyright © 2015 Vaishali I. Parekh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Lipoma in patients with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is a type of benign fat-cell tumor that has biallelic inactivation of MEN1 that encodes menin and could serve as a model to investigate normal and pathologic fat-cell (adipocyte) proliferation and function. The role of menin and its target genes in adipocytes is not known. We used in vitro differentiation to derive matched normal and menin-deficient adipocytes from wild type (WT) and menin-null (Men1-KO) mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), respectively, or 3T3-L1 cells without or with menin knockdown to investigate cell size, lipid content, and gene expression changes. Adipocytes derived from Men1-KO mESCs or after menin knockdown in 3T3-L1 cells showed a 1.5–1.7-fold increase in fat-cell size. Global gene expression analysis of mESC-derived adipocytes showed that lack of menin downregulated the expression of many differentially methylated genes including the tumor suppressor long noncoding RNA Meg3 but upregulated gene expression from the prolactin gene family locus. Our results show that menin deficiency leads to fat-cell hypertrophy and provide model systems that could be used to study the regulation of fat-cell size.