Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 219046, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/219046
Research Article

Cognitive Function and Salivary DHEA Levels in Physically Active Elderly African American Women

School of Kinesiology, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA

Received 10 December 2014; Revised 16 April 2015; Accepted 23 April 2015

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Damante

Copyright © 2015 Greggory R. Davis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. D. M. Diamond, B. J. Branch, and M. Fleshner, “The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) enhances hippocampal primed burst, but not long-term, potentiation,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 202, no. 3, pp. 204–208, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. E. Barrett-Connor, K.-T. Khaw, and S. S. C. Yen, “A prospective study of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, mortality, and cardiovascular disease,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 315, no. 24, pp. 1519–1524, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. G. A. Greendale, S. Edelstein, and E. Barrett-Connor, “Endogenous sex steroids and bone mineral density in older women and men: the Rancho Bernardo study,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 12, no. 11, pp. 1833–1843, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. R. R. Watson, A. Huls, M. Araghinikuam, and S. Chung, “Dehydroepiandrosterone and diseases of aging,” Drugs and Aging, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 274–291, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. E.-E. Baulieu, G. Thomas, S. Legrain et al., “Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, and aging: contribution of the DHEage study to a sociobiomedical issue,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 97, no. 8, pp. 4279–4284, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. K. S. Nair, R. A. Rizza, P. O'Brien et al., “DHEA in elderly women and DHEA or testosterone in elderly men,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 355, no. 16, pp. 1647–1659, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. L. D. Baker, L. L. Frank, K. Foster-Schubert et al., “Aerobic exercise improves cognition for older adults with glucose intolerance, a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease,” Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 569–579, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. R. E. Dustman, R. O. Ruhling, E. M. Russell et al., “Aerobic exercise training and improved neuropsychological function of older individuals,” Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 35–42, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. P. Boudou, E. de Kerviler, D. Erlich, P. Vexiau, and J.-F. Gautier, “Exercise training-induced triglyceride lowering negatively correlates with DHEA levels in men with type 2 diabetes,” International Journal of Obesity, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 1108–1112, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. Kalmijn, L. J. Launer, R. P. Stolk et al., “A prospective study on cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and cognitive function in the elderly,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 83, no. 10, pp. 3487–3492, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. Gallagher, M. M. Leitch, A. E. Massey, R. H. McAllister-Williams, and A. H. Young, “Assessing cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in saliva: effects of collection method,” Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 643–649, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. F. Vining, R. A. McGinley, and R. G. Symons, “Hormones in saliva: mode of entry and consequent implications for clinical interpretation,” Clinical Chemistry, vol. 29, no. 10, pp. 1752–1756, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. R. H. Straub, L. Konecna, S. Hrach et al., “Serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate are negatively correlated with serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), and DHEA inhibits IL-6 secretion from mononuclear cells in man in vitro: possible link between endocrinosenescence and immunosenescence,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol. 83, no. 6, pp. 2012–2017, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. Stenholm, M. Maggio, F. Lauretani et al., “Anabolic and catabolic biomarkers as predictors of muscle strength decline: the InCHIANTI study,” Rejuvenation Research, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 3–11, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. F. Hucklebridge, T. Hussain, P. Evans, and A. Clow, “The diurnal patterns of the adrenal steroids cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in relation to awakening,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 51–57, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M. Mitrushina and P. Satz, Handbook of Normative Data for Neuropsychological Assessment, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 2nd edition, 2005.
  17. M. J. Lambiase, K. P. Gabriel, L. H. Kuller, and K. A. Matthews, “Sleep and executive function in older women: the moderating effect of physical activity,” The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 69, no. 9, pp. 1170–1176, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. T. N. Tombaugh, “Trail Making Test A and B: normative data stratified by age and education,” Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 203–214, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. G. Beckham, S. Mizuguchi, C. Carter et al., “Relationships of isometric mid-thigh pull variables to weightlifting performance,” Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, vol. 53, no. 5, pp. 573–581, 2013. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. R. B. Cook, D. Collins, J. Tucker, and P. Zioupos, “Comparison of questionnaire and quantitative ultrasound techniques as screening tools for DXA,” Osteoporosis International, vol. 16, no. 12, pp. 1565–1575, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. S. R. Cummings, D. M. Black, M. C. Nevitt et al., “Bone density at various sites for prediction of hip fractures,” The Lancet, vol. 341, no. 8837, pp. 72–75, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. L. Ashendorf, A. L. Jefferson, M. K. O'Connor, C. Chaisson, R. C. Green, and R. A. Stern, “Trail making test errors in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment, and dementia,” Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 129–137, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. R. Davis, S. M. Shah, D. P. McKenzie, J. Kulkarni, S. L. Davison, and R. J. Bell, “Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels are associated with more favorable cognitive function in women,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol. 93, no. 3, pp. 801–808, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. S. D. Moffat, A. B. Zonderman, S. M. Harman, M. R. Blackman, C. Kawas, and S. M. Resnick, “The relationship between longitudinal declines in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations and cognitive performance in older men,” Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 160, no. 14, pp. 2193–2198, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. Šulcová, M. Hill, R. Hampl, and L. Stárka, “Age and sex related differences in serum levels of unconjugated dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphate in normal subjects,” Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 154, no. 1, pp. 57–62, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. W. M. Kohrt, D. B. Snead, E. Slatopolsky, and S. J. Birge Jr., “Additive effects of weight-bearing exercise and estrogen on bone mineral density in older women,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 1303–1311, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. E. S. Siris, P. D. Miller, E. Barrett-Connor et al., “Identification and fracture outcomes of undiagnosed low bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: results from the National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment,” The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 286, no. 22, pp. 2815–2822, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. M. M. Luckey, S. Wallenstein, R. Lapinski, and D. E. Meier, “A prospective study of bone loss in African-American and white women—a clinical research center study,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 81, no. 8, pp. 2948–2956, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. H. M. Perry III, M. Horowitz, J. E. Morley et al., “Aging and bone metabolism in African American and Caucasian women,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 1108–1117, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. J. M. Manson, M. D. Sammel, E. W. Freeman, and J. A. Grisso, “Racial differences in sex hormone levels in women approaching the transition to menopause,” Fertility and Sterility, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 297–304, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. Sinaki and K. P. Offord, “Physical activity in postmenopausal women: effect on back muscle strength and bone mineral density of the spine,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 69, no. 4, pp. 277–280, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus