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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 674734, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/674734
Research Article

Evaluation of Midnight Salivary Cortisol as a Predictor Factor for Common Carotid Arteries Intima Media Thickness in Patients with Clinically Inapparent Adrenal Adenomas

Internal Medicine I, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Hospital, 10043 Orbassano, Italy

Received 12 February 2015; Revised 22 April 2015; Accepted 28 April 2015

Academic Editor: Andre P. Kengne

Copyright © 2015 Giuseppe Reimondo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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