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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 834137, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/834137
Research Article

Gremlin, a Bone Morphogenetic Protein Antagonist, Is a Crucial Angiogenic Factor in Pituitary Adenoma

Department of Neurosurgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo 113-8602, Japan

Received 27 September 2014; Revised 10 February 2015; Accepted 16 February 2015

Academic Editor: Amelie Bonnefond

Copyright © 2015 Kenta Koketsu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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