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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2015, Article ID 915243, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/915243
Research Article

Paraoxonase 2 Induces a Phenotypic Switch in Macrophage Polarization Favoring an M2 Anti-Inflammatory State

1The Lipid Research Laboratory, Technion Faculty of Medicine, The Rappaport Family Institute for Research in the Medical Sciences, and Rambam Health Care Campus, 31096 Haifa, Israel
2Internal Medicine E Department, Rambam Health Care Campus, 31096 Haifa, Israel

Received 16 September 2015; Revised 17 November 2015; Accepted 19 November 2015

Academic Editor: Youngah Jo

Copyright © 2015 Marie Koren-Gluzer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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