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International Journal of Endocrinology
Volume 2016, Article ID 6437585, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6437585
Research Article

Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

1Conjoint Endocrine Laboratory, Chemical Pathology, Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia
2School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
3Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia

Received 15 June 2016; Revised 10 October 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016

Academic Editor: Sergio D. Paredes

Copyright © 2016 Huika Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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